Glendale
White Oak Swamp, Riddell's Shop
Civil War Virginia


American Civil War
June 30, 1862

Peninsula Campaign
Peninsula Campaign Map

This is the fifth of the Seven Days' Battles.

On June 30, Huger's, Longstreet's, and A.P. Hill's divisions converged on the retreating Union army in the vicinity of Glendale or Frayser's Farm.  Longstreet's and Hill's attacks penetrated the Union defense near Willis Church, routing McCall's division. McCall was captured. 

Union counterattacks by General Hooker's and Kearny's divisions sealed the break and saved their line of retreat along the Willis Church Road. Huger's advance was stopped on the Charles City Road.  "Stonewall"  Jackson's divisions were delayed by Franklin at White Oak Swamp.

Confederate Major General T.H. Holmes made a feeble attempt to turn the Union left flank at Turkey Bridge but was driven back by Federal Navy gunboats in James River.

Union generals Meade and Sumner and Confederate generals Anderson, Pender, and Featherston were wounded.

This was Lee's best chance to cut off the Union army from the James River.

That night, McClellan established a strong position on Malvern Hill.

Result(s): Inconclusive (Union withdrawal continued.)

Other Names: Nelson's Farm, Frayser's Farm, Charles City Crossroads, White Oak Swamp, New Market Road, Riddell's Shop

Location: Henrico County

Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March-September 1862) next battle in campaign    previous battle in campaign

Date(s): June 30, 1862

Principal Commanders: Major General George B. McClellan [US]; General Robert E. Lee [CS]

Forces Engaged: Armies

Estimated Casualties: 6,500 total

Seven Days Battles Map

Seven Days Battles Map
Oak Grove      Mechanicsville Gaines Mill Savage Station Glendale Malvern Hill
Echoes of Thunder
Echoes of Thunder
A Guide to the Seven Days Battles

This is a valuable and welcome addition to this series of battlefield guides. This book will provide you with a guide on the field or it will supplement reading about the American Civil War battle of The Seven Days.



Kindle Available
South Divided

A South Divided: Portraits of Dissent in the Confederacy
An account of Southern dissidents in the Civil War, at times labeled as traitors, Tories, deserters, or mossbacks during the war and loyalists, Lincoln loyalists, and Unionists by historians of the war





Original Work
The Seven Days
By Joe Ryan


Battlefield Atlas
A Battlefield Atlas of the Civil War
Informative text enhanced 24 three-color maps and 30 black/white historical photographs.
Savage Station, VA, Union Field Hospital After Battle, Civil War
Savage Station, Virginia
Union Field Hospital After Battle, Civil War

24 in. x 18 in.
Buy at AllPosters.com
Framed   Mounted


Civil War Confederate
Suede Grey Kepi Hat





Civil War Union
Suede Blue Kepi Hat

72 Piece Civil War Army Men
Play Set 52mm Union and Confederate Figures, Bridge, Horses, Canon
  • 48 Union and Confederate Soldiers up to 2-1/8 inches tall
  • 4 Horses, 4 Sandbag Bunkers, 6 Fence Sections, 3 Cannon, 3 Limber Wagons (Ammo Carts)
  • Bridge, Small Barracks, 2 Cardboard buildings
  • Scale: About 1/35th
Virginia State Battle Map 1862
State Battle Maps
Civil War Submarines
Confederate Commanders
Civil War Picture Album
Civil War Summary
Kids Zone Gettysburg
Kids Zone Underground Railroad
American Civil War Exhibits
Civil War Timeline
Women in the War
Civil War Revolver Pistol
Civil War Model 1851 Naval Pistol



Civil War Replica Musket
Civil War Musket
McClellans Story
McClellan's Own Story

Born in Philadelphia on December 3, 1826, George B. McClellan graduated from West Point in 1846 before serving in the Mexican War. At the start of the Civil War, McClellan was put in a position of leadership and after a successful campaign in Virginia he was given command of the Army of Potomac, one of the Union's strongest armies. He led the Peninsular campaign with almost 100,000 troops under his command. marching toward Richmond.
Counter Thrust
Counter-Thrust
From the Peninsula to the Antietam

A window into the Union's internal conflict at building a military leadership team. Lincoln's administration in disarray, with relations between the president and field commander McClellan strained to the breaking point. Shows how the fortunes of war shifted abruptly in the Union's favor, climaxing at Antietam.
Kindle Available

Robert E. Lee
This book not only offers concise detail but also gives terrific insight into the state of the Union and Confederacy during Lee's life. Lee was truly a one of kind gentleman and American, and had Virginia not been in the south or neutral, he ultimately would have led the Union forces.
Peninsula Campaign
The Peninsula Campaign Of 1862: Yorktown To The Seven Days

George B. McClellan got closer to Richmond than any previous Union general by a bold amphibious landing, but lost his advantage due to his own indecision and Robert E. Lee's superior generalship.
Kindle Available

The Richmond Campaign of 1862: The Peninsula and the Seven Days
The Richmond campaign of 1862 ranks as one of the most important military operations of the American Civil War. Key political, diplomatic, social, and military issues were at stake as CSA General Lee and USA General McClellan met.
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To The Gates of Richmond
The Peninsula Campaign

For three months General McClellan battled his way toward Richmond, but then CSA General Lee took command of the Confederate forces. In seven days, Lee drove the cautious McClellan out, thereby changing the course of the war
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Sword Over Richmond: An Eyewitness History Of McClellan's Peninsula Campaign

Told through the words of participants and observers, both military and civilian, this book is an account of the events that followed George B. McClellan's appointment as commander of the Army of the Potomac, and his controversial Peninsula Campaign
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The Seven Days Battles

One of the most decisive military campaigns in Western history, the Seven Days were fought in the area southeast of the Confederate capitol of Richmond from June 25 to July 1, 1862

    

    
    


Sources:
U.S. National Park Service
U.S. Library of Congress.