Dandridge Tennessee


American Civil War
January 17, 1864

Union forces under Major General John G. Parke advanced on Dandridge, Tennessee, near the East Tennessee & Virginia Railroad, on January 14, forcing Lt. General James Longstreet's Confederate troops to fall back. Longstreet, however, moved additional troops into the area on the 15th to meet the enemy and threaten the Union base at New Market.

On the 16th, Brig. General Samuel D. Sturgis, commanding the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Ohio, rode forward to occupy Kimbrough's Crossroads. Within three or four miles of his objective, Sturgis's cavalry met Rebel troops, forcing them back towards the crossroads. As the Union cavalry neared the crossroads, they discovered an enemy infantry division with artillery that had arrived the day before.

The Union cavalry could not dislodge these Rebels and was compelled to retire to Dandridge. About noon the next day, Sturgis received information that the Confederates were preparing for an attack so he formed his men into line of battle. About 4:00 pm, the Confederates advanced and the fighting quickly became general.  The battle continued until after dark with the Federals occupying about the same battle line as when the fighting started.

The Union forces fell back to New Market and Strawberry Plains during the night, but the Rebels were unable to pursue because of the lack of cannons, ammunition, and shoes. For the time being, the Union forces left the area.

The Confederates had failed to destroy or capture the Federals as they should have.

Result(s): Confederate victory

Location: Jefferson County

Campaign: Operations about Dandridge, Tennessee (1863-64)

Date(s): January 17, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. General Samuel D. Sturgis [US]; Lt. General James Longstreet [CS]

Forces Engaged: Cavalry Corps, Army of the Ohio, and Infantry of the IV Army Corps [US]; Department of East Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Total unknown (US 150; CS unknown)

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Sources:
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U.S. Library of Congress.

 


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