Monett's Ferry
Cane River Crossing
Civil War Louisiana


American Civil War
April 23, 1864

Near the end of the Red River Expedition, Major General Nathaniel P. Banks's army evacuated Grand Ecore and retreated to Alexandria, pursued by Confederate forces.

Banks's advance party, commanded by Brigadier General William H. Emory, encountered Brigadier General Hamilton P. Bee's cavalry division near Monett's Ferry (Cane River Crossing) on the morning of April 23.

Bee had been ordered to dispute Emory's crossing, and he placed his men so that natural features covered both his flanks. Reluctant to assault the Rebels in their strong position, Emory demonstrated in front of the Confederate lines, while two brigades went in search of another crossing.

One brigade found a ford, crossed, and attacked the Rebels in their flank. Bee had to retreat. Banks's men laid pontoon bridges and, by the next day, had all crossed the river.

The Confederates at Monett's Ferry missed an opportunity to destroy or capture Banks's army.

Result(s): Union victory

Location: Natchitoches Parish

Campaign: Red River Campaign (1864)

Date(s): April 23, 1864

Principal Commanders: Major General Nathaniel P. Banks [US]; Brigadier General Hamilton P. Bee [CS]

Forces Engaged: Red River Expeditionary Force (Banks's Department of the Gulf) [US]; Bee's Cavalry Division [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 600 total (US 200; CS 400)


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Sources:
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U.S. Library of Congress.

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