Black Slave Owners
   

Port Hudson
Civil War Louisiana


American Civil War
May 21-July 9, 1863

In cooperation with Major General Ulysses S. Grant's offensive against Vicksburg, Union Major General Nathaniel P. Banks's army moved against the Confederate stronghold at Port Hudson on the Mississippi River.

On May 27, after their frontal assaults were repulsed, the Federals settled into a siege which lasted for 48 days. Banks renewed his assaults on June 14 but the defenders successfully repelled them.

On July 9, 1863, after hearing of the fall of Vicksburg, the Confederate garrison of Port Hudson surrendered, opening the Mississippi River to Union navigation from its source to New Orleans.

At the battle of Port Hudson, Louisiana, May 27, 1863, the African American soldiers bravely advanced over open ground in the face of deadly artillery fire. Although the attack failed, the black solders proved their capability to withstand the heat of battle.

Result(s): Union victory

Location: East Baton Rouge Parish and East Feliciana Parish

Campaign: Siege of Port Hudson (1863)

Date(s): May 21-July 9, 1863

Principal Commanders: Major General Nathaniel P. Banks [US]; Major General Franklin Gardner [CS]

Forces Engaged: XIX Army Corps, Army of the Gulf [US]; Confederate forces, 3rd District, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Port Hudson [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 12,208 total (US 5,000; CS 7,208)


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Sources:
U.S. National Park Service
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