Dalton I
Civil War Georgia


American Civil War
February 22-27, 1864

From Vicksburg, Mississippi, Sherman launched a campaign to take the important railroad center at Meridian and, if the situation was favorable, to push on to Selma and threaten Mobile, in order to prevent the shipment of Confederate men and supplies.

To counter the threat, Confederate President Jefferson Davis ordered troops into the area.

While these operations unfolded, Thomas determined to probe General Johnston's army in the hope that Johnston's loss of two divisions, sent to reinforce Lieutenant General Leonidas Polk as he withdrew from Meridian to Demopolis, Alabama, would make him vulnerable.

Skirmishing and intense fighting occurred throughout the demonstration.

At Crow Valley on the 25th, Union troops almost turned the Rebel right flank, but ultimately it held.

On the 27th, Thomas's army withdrew, realizing that Johnston was ready and able to counter any assault.

Result(s): Confederate victory

Location: Whitfield County

Campaign: Demonstration on Dalton (1864)

Date(s): February 22-27, 1864

Principal Commanders: Major General George H. Thomas [US]; General Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Army of the Cumberland [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown


Fighting Joe Hooker
Union general Joseph Hooker assumed command of an army demoralized by defeat and diminished by desertion. Acting swiftly, the general reorganized his army, routed corruption among quartermasters, improved food and sanitation, and boosted morale by granting furloughs and amnesties. The test of his military skill came in the battle of Chancellorsville. It was one of the Union Army's worst defeats


Kindle Available
Civil War Firearms

Standard Catalog of
Civil War Firearms

Over 700 photographs and a rarity scale for each gun, this comprehensive guide to the thousands of weapons used by Billy Yank and Johnny Reb will be indispensable for historians and collectors.
North and South Carolina and Part of Georgia, c.1861
North and South Carolina and Part of Georgia, c.1861
48 in. x 38.5 in$169.99
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Framed

Civil War Revolver Pistol
Civil War Model 1851 Naval Pistol
Engraved Silver Tone / Gold Tone Finish and Wooden Grips - Replica of Revolver Used by Both USA / Union and CSA / Confederate Forces

12 Inch Action Figures
Georgia State Battle Map
Civil War State Battle Maps
American Civil War Exhibits
American Civil War Timeline
Civil War Summary
Documents of the War
Confederate Commanders
Union Generals
Women Civil War Soldiers
Kids Zone Exhibits
Civil War Music History
Reenactors Row

Lodge Logic Camp Dutch Oven
Large 8 quart cast iron oven. The legs are for ease of use in campfires. Flanged lid to place coals on top of oven. Great for stews, chilli, roasts (wild game) and complete recipes for everything including old-fashioned bread. A must for reenactors villages.

Camping Supplies
Cast Iron Waffle Iron
12 Inch Pre Seasoned Cast Iron Skillet
Full size military Camp Cot
One and two man tents
Large size and multiple room tents
Hiking Boots
Jan Sport Back Packs
High Sierra Camp Equipment

Savannah
A large Union army led by Sherman leaves Chattanooga and northern Georgia camps and marches south to Atlanta and ultimately arrives at the coastal city of Savannah, laying waste to the territory through which it passes

The Atlanta Campaign of 1864
The operations of the Union and Confederate armies from the perspective of the soldiers and the top generals. He offers new accounts and analyses of the major events of the campaign, and, in the process, corrects many long-standing myths, misconceptions, and mistakes. He challenges the standard view of Sherman's performance.

Sherman's March: The First Full-Length Narrative of General William T. Sherman's Devastating March through Georgia and the Carolinas
Beginning with the fall of Atlanta, the unrelenting aggressive slash and burn total warfare of General Sherman's Union troops, and then the final march into Raleigh
Kindle Available

Southern Storm: Sherman's March to the Sea
The destruction spanned more than sixty miles in width and virtually cut the South in two, disabling the flow of supplies to the Confederate army. He led more than 60,000 Union troops to blaze a path from Atlanta to Savannah, ordering his men to burn crops, kill livestock, and decimate everything that fed the Rebel war machine

The Children of Pride: Selected letters of the family of the Rev. Dr. Charles Colcock Jones from the years 1860-1868
This book provides the thoughts of the entire family, all literate and well-spoken people, over the entire period from the 1850s, just living their ante-bellum experience, to the idea of the war on the horizon, entering into it and living it day by day. This is all seen through ordinary every-day experiences, family anecdotes, and discussions of what is occurring

Guide to the Atlanta Campaign: Rocky Face Ridge to Kennesaw Mountain
Following the capture of Chattanooga, the Union initiated battles and operations that took it from the Tennessee border to the outskirts of Atlanta. Bloody confrontations at places such as Resaca and New Hope Church. Grant had ordered Sherman to penetrate the enemy's interior and inflict "all the damage you can against their War resources,"

Cracker Cavaliers: The 2nd Georgia Cavalry Under Wheeler and Forrest
The Second Georgia fought in such famous campaigns as Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Knoxville, Resaca, Atlanta, and Bentonville, they also participated in deadly encounters at Farmington, Mossy Creek, Noonday Creek, Sunshine Church, and Waynesboro

The Battle of Resaca:
Atlanta Campaign, 1864

Ideal book for a Civil War buff. Take it with you if you visit the site. Written accounts from the soldiers that stormed across the hills put you in the moment. Several good maps and even pictures taken a few days after the battle help take you out of your living room and into the past



Confederate President Jefferson Davis
Civil War Submarines
Civil War Cooking
Civil War Picture Album

Atlanta Georgia Current Weather City Information Hotels and Camping Information

Source:
U.S. National Park Service
U.S. Library of Congress