Fort Pulaski
Civil War Georgia


American Civil War
April 10-11, 1862

Fort Pulaski, built by the U.S. Army before the war, is located near the mouth of the Savannah River, blocking upriver access to Savannah. Fortifications such as Pulaski, called third system forts, were considered invincible, but the new technology of rifled artillery changed that.

On February 19, 1862, Brigadier General Thomas W. Sherman ordered Captain Quincy A. Gillmore, an engineer officer, to take charge of the investment force and begin the bombardment and capture of the fort. Gillmore emplaced artillery on the mainland southeast of the fort and began the bombardment on April 10 after Colonel Charles H. Olmstead refused to surrender the fort.

Within hours, Gillmore's rifled artillery had breached the southeast scarp of the fort, and he continued to exploit it. Some of his shells began to damage the traverse shielding the magazine in the northwest bastion. Realizing that if the magazine exploded the fort would be seriously damaged and the garrison would suffer severe casualties, Olmstead surrendered after 2:00 pm on April 11.

Result(s): Union victory

Location: Chatham County

Campaign: Operations against Fort Pulaski (1862) only battle in campaign Campaigns

Date(s): April 10-11, 1862

Principal Commanders: Major General David Hunter and Capt. Quincy A. Gillmore [US]; Colonel Charles H. Olmstead [CS]

Forces Engaged: The Port Royal Expeditionary Force's Fort Pulaski investment troops [US]; Fort Pulaski Garrison [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 365 total (US 1; CS 364)

fort pulaski civil war georgia
Fort Pulaski after it's capture by the Union.
Fort Pulaski
Sumter is Avenged: The Siege and Reduction of Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski controlled the harbor of Savannah, Georgia, and had to be destroyed for the Union blockade of Confederate shipping to become effective. The bombardment of Fort Pulaski was the first example of the use of rifled artillery against a masonry fort.





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Fort Pulaski, GA, Gun Mounted on Ft. Pulaski Wall, Civil War
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Source:
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